1098-1099

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Reports of Committee on Foreign Relations 1789-1901 Volume 6 pp1098-1099 300dpi scan (VERY LARGE!)

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-p1098-

Mr. Day. No, not at all; except the sentry, who was pacing in front of the gate.

Senator Frye. During Monday your people feared there would be riots?

Mr. Day. Yes.

Senator Frye. Was that fear general?

Mr. Day. Yes.

Senator Frye. In your opinion was there danger to the American people and their property at that time?

Mr. Day. Yes.

Senator Frye. Was American property scattered all around in that section of the city?

Mr. Day. Yes.

Senator Frye. Did you know how general the alarm was amongst the people at that time, on Monday? What were they afraid of principally?

Mr. Day. They were afraid of riots and incendiarism and conflict between the white men, who were determined to make a change, and the natives.

Senator Frye. Did you know Minister Stevens?

Mr. Day. Yes.

Senator Frye. Well?

Mr. Day. I treated most of his family during the time he was there.

Senator Frye. Were you the physician for Chief-Justice Judd?

Mr. Day. Yes; I have treated nearly all his children and himself.

Senator Frye. Do you know whether or not there was any expectation on the part of the men who were engaged in behalf of the Provisional Government that Minister Stevens was going to have the troops help them?

Mr. Day. I had no such idea whatever. I supposed they were landed simply for the protection of American interests and under the excitement of the inevitable conflict that was coming.

Senator Frye. Did you expect the troops to take part in the conflict as between the Queen and the Provisional Government?

Mr. Day. No.

Senator Frye. Do you know what the Provisional Government expected-the leading men in the affair?

Mr. Day. I do not; I never heard that they did.

Senator Frye. Did the troops take any part?

Mr. Day. They did not.

Senator Frye. Do you know anything about what forces the Queen had on that Monday?

Mr. Day. I know that she had the Queen's guard and the police.

Senator Frye. The Queen's guard consisted of about 75 men and the police about 60?

Senator Gray. Ask Mr. Day how many they consisted of?

Senator Frye. Do you know how many they consisted of?

Mr. Day. The guard, I suppose, consisted of about 80 men, and the police? I do not remember the exact number-I suppose 65 or 75.

Senator Frye. Do you know what armed forces the Queen had on her part on Monday?

Mr. Day. I knew of none.

Senator Frye. Was there any fear on the part of the men of the Provisional Government of a conflict with the Queen's forces?

Mr. Day. They had no fear at all; they feared a conflict, but had no fear of the result.

-p1099-

Senator Frye. So far as you know, if the Boston had been a thousand miles at sea would there have been a different result?

Mr. Day. There would have been no difference in the result, except, probably, it would have been wrought with blood.

Senator Frye. But as to who would win they had no question?

Mr. Day. No.

Senator Frye. Was there any fear among the Provisional Government's men of the Queen's Guard?

Mr. Day. I do not understand your question.

Senator Frye. Among the white men, the Provisional Government's men, was there any fear of the valor of the Queen's Guard?

Mr. Day. They expected they would fight, but they had no fear of them.

Senator Frye. They were native Hawaiians, were they not?

Mr. Day. Native Hawaiians.

Senator Frye. Is there much fighting material among the native Hawaiians?

Mr. Day. They are not a belligerent people.

Senator Frye. Quiet, good-natured people?

Mr. Day. They are.

Senator Frye. Were you in Honolulu during the Wilcox riot of 1889?

Mr. Day. I was in the islands; I was not in Honolulu just at that time. I had gone to Mauai just at the time that occurred.

Senator Frye. Were troops landed at that time?

Mr. Day. No.

Senator Frye. What is the character of these men who are now in control of the Government?

Mr. Day. They are the best men in the community.

Senator Frye. Compare favorably with men here?

Mr. Day. Yes.

Senator Frye. Men of education, most of them?

Mr. Day. Yes.

Senator Frye. Were you there when the flag was hauled down?

Mr. Day. Yes.

Senator Frye. Was there any commotion?

Mr. Day. None.

Senator Frye. In your opinion, can the Provisional Government maintain itself?

Mr. Day. Yes.

Senator Frye. The chief followers of the Queen are whom?

Mr. Day. Hawaiians and half-whites.

Senator Frye. Natives, you mean?

Mr. Day. Natives.

Senator Frye. Half-whites?

Mr. Day. Half-whites and a large proportion of English people.

Senator Frye. What kind of men were those whom the Queen put into her cabinet-Cornwell and Colburn?

Mr. Day. They were not men who commanded the confidence of the community.

Senator Gray. That is, of what you called the best men of the community; or do you mean the whole population?

Mr. Day. I should say that they did not command the confidence of a large majority of the white community.

Senator Gray. Were you in Honolulu when Mr. Blount was there?

Mr. Day. Yes.

Senator Gray. Did you have any communications with him?


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