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Reports of Committee on Foreign Relations 1789-1901 Volume 6 pp533 300dpi scan (VERY LARGE!)

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No; we want no joint protectorate, no occupation there by any European power, no Pacific Egypt. We need the group as part and parcel of the United States, and should take what is offered us, even at the hazard of war. Westward the star of empire takes its way. Let the Monroe doctrine stay not its hand until it holds Hawaii securely within its grasp. In this matter the undersigned speaks from personal knowledge, gained through official visits to the islands in 1874 and 1882, and could readily pursue the subject further and more into detail, but for the present forbears.

George E. Belknap.
Brookline, January 30, 1893.


TESTIMONY BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN RELATIONS, UNDER THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION OF THE SENATE OF DECEMBER 20, 1893:

Resolved, That the Committee on Foreign Relations shall inquire and report whether any, and, if so, what irregularities have occurred in the diplomatic or other intercourse between the United States and Hawaii in relation to the recent political revolution in Hawaii, and to this end said committee is authorized to send for persons and papers and to administer oaths to witnesses.

FIRST DAY.

Washington, D.C., December 27, 1893.

The subcommittee met pursuant to notice.

Present: The Chairman (Senator Morgan), and Senators Gray, Sherman and Frye.

Absent: Senator Butler.

SWORN STATEMENT OF REV. OLIVER P. EMERSON.

The Chairman. Mr. Emerson, state your age?

Mr. Emerson. I am 48. Born in 1845.

The Chairman. Where were you born?

Mr. Emerson. I was born on the island of Maui, one of the Sandwich islands.

Senator Sherman. You are of American descent?

Mr. Emerson. My father and mother were New Hampshire people.

The Chairman. HOW long had your father and mother resided in Hawaii before your birth?

Mr. Emerson. From 1832 to 1845.

The Chairman. What was your father's vocation?

Mr. Emerson. My father was a missionary. When I was born he was a missionary. He was a teacher then at the Government school —-no, it was not a Government school; it was a missionary school. I am not sure about that. It was the only college where the natives went. It was at Subinaluero, Maui. My father was stationed at Waialua, Oahu. It is thirty miles from the city.

Senator Gray. Is that the principal island?

Mr. Emerson. It is the island on which Honolulu is situated; it is the best port and the seat of the Government.

Senator Gray. What is your vocation?

Mr. Emerson. I am the Secretary of the Hawaiian Board of Missions.

The Chairman. Are you a minister of the gospel, also?


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