588-589

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Reports of Committee on Foreign Relations 1789-1901 Volume 6 pp588-589 300dpi scan (VERY LARGE!)

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-p588-

Mr. Jones. Yes.

The Chairman. Do you know where Gibson came from before he arrived at the Hawaiian islands?

Mr. Jones. I think he came from the Mormon settlement in Salt Lake.

The Chairman. Do you remember whether he brought any Mormons over with him?

Mr. Jones. I do not.

The Chairman. Was there in any particular part of the islands a populous Mormon colony?

Mr. Jones. The island of Lanai was set apart as a colony for Mormons— as a Mormon settlement.

The Chairman. Who controlled that settlement?

Mr. Jones. Gibson.

The Chairman. It was after that settlement was made—set apart— that Gibson became a member of Kalakaua's cabinet?

Mr. Jones. Oh, yes; long after.

The Chairman. How long did Gibson remain in Kalakaua's cabinet?

Mr. Jones. He remained through several changes. Gibson would always be in the new deal.

The Chairman. During the time that Gibson was a member of Kalauaka's cabinet Don Celso Caesar Moreno appeared there?

Mr. Jones. I have forgotten. I think Moreno—I have forgotten; I was away when Moreno went in; I was away in the States.

The Chairman. You do not know of that except by public reputation?

Mr. Jones. I was not there.

The Chairman. He became a member of the cabinet?

Mr. Jones. Moreno?

The Chairman. Yes.

Mr. Jones. He was there only three days.

The Chairman. He became a member of the cabinet?

Mr. Jones. Yes, minister of foreign affairs for three days, I think.

The Chairman. Do you know what circumstances led to his being dismissed?

Mr. Jones. At the request of a public meeting.

The Chairman. Of the citizens, demanding that he should be removed?

Mr. Jones. Yes; and he was. As I say, I was not there at the time.

The Chairman. I am speaking of the general rumor or historical traditions of Hawaii on that subject. Before his removal what disposition did he make of the foreign ministry ?

Mr. Jones. Who?

The Chairman. Moreno.

Senator Frye During the three days that he was in there, what did he do?

Mr. Jones. I have forgotten. For matters of history you will find Prof. Alexander right up. He has written a history of the islands.

The Chairman. I was trying to get from you the general impressions of the people of Hawaii on this subject. I know you do not know it in detail. Did Moreno leave the islands?

Mr. Jones. Oh, he had to leave.

The Chairman. Was he banished?

Mr. Jones. The opposition was so great that he had to leave.

The Chairman. He came there, to the islands, from China?

-p589-

Mr. Jones. I have not known anything of him since that time, only that he has been here in Washington. I have heard of him occasionally.

The Chairman. Had the people of Hawaii any opinion as to the reasons or causes which gave Moreno the ascendancy over Kalakaua— made him premier of Kalakaua's cabinet?

Mr. Jones. I am not aware of the reasons?

The Chairman. You do not know the reasons?

Mr. Jones. No.

The Chairman. No public sentiment or belief in regard to the reasons?

Mr. Jones. None that I know of.

The Chairman. What became of Gibson?

Mr. Jones. Gibson in 1887—the revolution of 1887—was put out of office, and then he was virtually deported. He went to California and never returned.

The Chairman. What became of his Mormon colony that he took over with him?

Mr. Jones. That disappeared, went to pieces, and then Gibson obtained possession of the island of Lanai for his own purposes, and that is all broken up now.

The Chairman. Did he sell it?

Mr. Jones. No; his daughter inherited the property of Lanai.

The Chairman. She is in possession of the whole island?

Mr. Jones. Yes.

The Chairman. About how much?

Mr. Jones. There are crown lands there and other lands in the island. She is the owner of the property that was originally purchased for the Mormons, as I understand.

The Chairman. This daughter has succeeded to the title?

Mr. Jones. She enjoys all that Jones died possessed of.

The Chairman. Considerable estate?

Mr. Jones. Yes.

The Chairman. About how much?

Mr. Jones. I suppose it is worth perhaps $100,000. And there is something of a mortgage upon it; I do not know how much. I have never been on the land.

The Chairman. Do you know the area?

Mr. Jones. I do not know.

The Chairman. You do not know whether it is good land or not?

Mr. Jones. It is mostly for sheep-raising; very little for other purposes. I have never been upon the land.

The Chairman. You have mentioned two members of the Kalakaua cabinet—Moreno and Gibson. Was there any other man in Kalakaua's cabinet whose reputation was not good among the people of Hawaii for honesty and loyalty?

Mr. Jones. I do not recall to mind any others. I do not know how many he had. He had a large number of cabinets, but I do not recall any of them to mind just now but those two.

The Chairman. Were Gibson and Moreno there in the cabinet before this revolution of 1887 occurred?

Mr. Jones. Yes; Gibson was in the cabinet in the revolution.

The Chairman. During the revolution?

Mr. Jones. Yes.

The Chairman. And he was dismissed in consequence of the revolution?

Mr. Jones. Yes.


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