548-549

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Reports of Committee on Foreign Relations 1789-1901 Volume 6 pp548-549 300dpi scan (VERY LARGE!)

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-p548-

Mr. Emerson. Yes.

The Chairman. Where were the troops at the time that flag was raised?

Mr. Emerson. They were quartered right here at Camp Boston.

The Chairman. Where was the minister of the United States residing at the time that flag was raised over the Aliolani Hall?

Mr. Emerson. Right there [indicating].

The Chairman. Is that the palace usually occupied by the Queen?

Mr. Emerson. The court has been at lolani Palace.

Senator Sherman. Is the Queen's home within the bounds of the city

Mr. Emerson. Yes; the home is right there [indicating].

Senator Gray. Not the palace, but the Queen's home.

Mr. Emerson. Yes.

Senator Sherman. I supposed it was out some distance.

Mr. Emerson. NO.

The Chairman. Mark where the Queen's home is.

Mr. Emerson. Right there [marking].

The Chairman. You say you did not see the United States flag until two weeks after the landing of the marines?

Mr. Emerson. That or ten days. I can not say how long; but it was considerably later.

The Chairman. Were these troops that you saw quartered in this open park accompanied with a flag?

Mr. Emerson. I think the flag of the United States was with each squad. Camp Boston was there [indicating].

Senator Gray. Was that where they were Friday night?

Mr. Emerson. Not Friday night.

Senator Gray. Monday night?

Mr. Emerson. Yes.

The Chairman. Was this flag raised over Aliolani Hall?

Mr. Emerson. Not until two weeks after.

The Chairman. And they made their camp there?

Mr. Emerson. Yes.

The Chairman. And in the meantime the Queen had retired to her private home?

Mr. Emerson. Yes. She retired Wednesday. The home has always been kept open.

The Chairman. Were you present when the flag was raised there?

Mr. Emerson. No.

The Chairman. Of course you know nothing about the orders on which it was done?

Mr. Emerson. No.

The Chairman. Are you pretty certain it was as much as two weeks after the landing of the marines before that flag was raised on Aliolani Hall.

Senator Sherman. He said seven or ten days.

Mr. Emerson. I said in the neighborhood of ten days.

The Chairman. If there had been a flag raised on these buildings prior to that time, would you have seen it?

Mr. Emerson. I certainly would have seen it. There was a flag on the consulate and a great many flags in the street; on private houses they had American flags flying; but over the Government buildings I did not see it until some time afterwards.

The Chairman. Was any Hawaiian flag flying at any time?

Mr. Emerson. I think the flag on the Government building was raised and kept up, the two together.

-p549-

The Chairman. You think the two together?

Mr. Emerson. Yes.

The Chairman. Are you certain of that?

Mr. Emerson. I am sure of that—so sure that it was a matter of talk.

Senator Sherman. That Hawaii and the United States were in partnership?

Mr. Emerson. Yes.

Senator Gray. DO you mean the flags were on the same staff?

Mr. Emerson. I think not on the same staff. I am not sure about that. I think on different staffs.

The Chairman. YOU spoke of the Government building. That is different from lolani Palace?

Mr. Emerson. I do not know whether they had two staffs there or not. But on the Government building I saw the two flags waving together.

The Chairman. What time was the flag raised on the Government building?

Mr. Emerson. I think the same time it was raised on lolani Palace.

The Chairman. You do not remember to have seen the flag of the United States on the Government building until you saw it on lolani Palace.

Mr. Emerson. No. I am not sure of two flags on lolani Palace.

The Chairman. You saw on the Government building two, on lolani Palace only one?

Mr. Emerson. I am not sure about that.

Senator Gray. What was the opium bill of which you spoke awhile ago, the one which was passed by the Legislature, and which was so objectionable to some of the good people of Honolulu.

Mr. Emerson. I can speak only in general terms of it; it was a bill regulating the sale of opium.

Senator Gray. Did you ever read it?

Mr. Emerson. I think I have read it; I am not sure; I have seen it in the papers, the bills as they are published from time to time.

Senator Gray. Can you recollect what the provisions of it were?

Mr. Emerson. No.

Senator Gray. You say that prior to the passage of that bill there had been a bitter complaint about what was called the existence of an opium ring, that smuggled opium into the islands?

Mr. Emerson. Yes.

Senator Gray. Was the importation absolutely prohibited—I mean prior to the passage of the bill?

Mr. Emerson. I can not say just what the law was in regard to that; but as I understand it there was—my impression is it was to be used in certain ways as a drug.

Senator Gray. I want to know if you know.

Mr. Emerson. I would rather say I do not know.

Senator Gray. YOU say you do not know whether you read that bill or not. Do you know whether the bill that passed provided for the licensing of the sale of opium under Government regulation?

Mr. Emerson. According to my recollection that was the nature of the bill—Government regulation of the sale.

Senator Gray. What was the lottery bill?

Mr. Emerson. I was in the Legislature when that bill was passed.

The Chairman. Were you a member of the Legislature?

Mr. Emerson. No; I beg pardon, I was attending.


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