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Reports of Committee on Foreign Relations 1789-1901 Volume 6 pp730-731 300dpi scan (VERY LARGE!)

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Mr. Hobbs. I should say so—was at the time I left Honolulu.

The Chairman. And even up to now?

Mr. Hobbs. Yes; my confidence is stronger now. They are better able to defend themselves than they were when I left.

The Chairman. Do you think any man or set of men would be able by combination and conspiracy to put those native people into a state of hostility and belligerency and war toward the Provisional Government?

Mr. Hobbs. The native people.

The Chairman. Yes.

Mr. Hobbs. In my opinion it would be a very difficult thing to do.

The Chairman. You think a good strong army in respect of numbers could not be organized there under existing conditions?

Mr. Hobbs. Not of natives. I think 50 white men could go all through the islands.

The Chairman. You predicate that belief of the characteristics of the people?

Mr. Hobbs. Yes.

The Chairman. As I understand they are people who have been during all their career given to obedience?

Mr. Hobbs. Yes.

The Chairman. And the power that is backed by sufficient authority and resources to maintain itself is apt to be sustained by them.

Mr. Hobbs. Yes; I should say that without any reservation.

The Chairman. What is the general character for intelligence and good conduct and good motives and good purposes of those persons who are now engaged in the effort to govern Hawaii under the present organization called the "Provisional Government"?

Mr. Hobbs. I think it is a desire to have a good strong government, which they have not had during this dynasty. They have been in an unsettled state during the whole time of this reign. They have had revolutions about every year or two, and they have never felt that they have had good, substantial government.

The Chairman. Are you speaking of the reign of Kalakaua and Liliuokalani?

Mr. Hobbs. Yes.

The Chairman. You are not speaking of the Kamehameha reigns?

Mr. Hobbs. No.

Senator Frye. Mr. Hobbs did not answer all of your former question.

The Chairman. Let the question be read.

The question was read as follows: "What is the general character for intelligence and good conduct and good motives and good purposes of those persons who are now engaged in the effort to govern Hawaii under the present organization called the Provisional Government?"

Mr. Hobbs. In my opinion they are the best men in the islands— men who are the most reliable and respectable in the islands that I know.

The Chairman. How would those men compare with the better class of people in the United States?

Mr. Hobbs. Compare most favorably.

Senator Frye. In education and everything?

Mr. Hobbs. Education; yes, refinement and culture.

The Chairman. Have you ever seen any disposition on the part of

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the ruling authorities there—the white people—to wrong or bear down upon the native Kanaka population?

Mr. Hobbs. No.

The Chairman. Is the reverse of that proposition true?

Mr. Hobbs. I should say so.

The Chairman. What seems to be the state of feeling between the Kanaka population and the white people, taking them at large—taking the different classes—whether it is friendly, agreeable, or hostile?

Mr. Hobbs. So far as I was able to observe that point I should say that it is favorable.

The Chairman. I suppose necessarily there must be some race jealousies there?

Mr. Hobbs. I think that is so, more particularly among the half whites than among the pure natives.

The Chairman. Would you say that there was a stronger condition of race jealously existing in Hawaii between the whites and the native Kanakas than there is in these States, Southern States, Washington— I will say between the whites and negroes?

Mr. Hobbs. Not so much.

The Chairman. Is it considered disreputable for a white man to marry a Kanaka woman?

Mr. Hobbs. No; many have done so.

The Chairman. But it is quite disreputable for a white man to marry a negro woman here.

Mr. Hobbs. Oh, certainly.

The Chairman. Take them in their churches, schools, business erlations, agricultural occupations and associations—take the whole thing together, does there seem to be any real hostility between these different races?

Mr. Hobbs. I should say not.

The Chairman. Do they live on amicable terms?

Mr. Hobbs. Yes.

The Chairman. And have good will and encouragement for each other?

Mr. Hobbs. I should say so, as a rule; yes.

The Chairman. Of course, the ordinary distinctions which are created by education and different methods of reasoning must make their impressions there as they do everywhere else?

Mr. Hobbs. In the social gatherings there you will see half castes and pure natives in society all together.

The Chairman. Is Hawaii a pleasant place for residence?

Mr. Hobbs. I liked it very much myself.

The Chairman. I speak now more particularly of the society of Honolulu and larger towns—Hilo?

Mr. Hobbs. I only know about Honolulu, and the society there is a delightful one. It is quite as refined as you would find in any town in the United States, go where you will.

The Chairman. Would you call the people there refined and intelligent?

Mr. Hobbs. Yes.

The Chairman. People of good tastes and aspirations?

Mr. Hobbs. Yes.

The Chairman. And people of broad intelligence?

Mr. Hobbs. Yes.

The Chairman. Had you ever heard from Captain Wiltse any observations


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